Turin Shroud

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Lynn and Clive in Florence during the filming of the 1995 BBC Everyman documentary ‘Double Exposure’
Lynn and Clive in Florence during the filming of the 1995 BBC Everyman documentary ‘Double Exposure’


Filming the shroud replication for ‘Double Exposure’ in the Villa Vignamaggio in Tuscany
Filming the shroud replication for ‘Double Exposure’ in the Villa Vignamaggio in Tuscany


The ‘shroud’ image produced for Everyman, from a bust of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius, seen here as it appears to the eye.
The ‘shroud’ image produced for Everyman, from a bust of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius, seen here as it appears to the eye.


The replica Marcus Aurelius ‘shroud’ seen in photographic negative
The replica Marcus Aurelius ‘shroud’ seen in photographic negative

‘If I had to name just one book that sparked off the whole da Vinci craze, this would be it. This is the book that gave me the most food for thought.’
Javier Sierra, New York Times bestselling author of The Secret Supper

Turin Shroud: In Whose Image? is a book to which all the tabloid adjectives truly apply. It really is astonishing, gruesome, shocking and sensational. It even appears to be true.’
Washington Times

‘…a very convincing argument that could rewrite the history of photography and shroud Leonardo in even more mystique.’
Amateur Photographer


Originally Turin Shroud: In Whose Image? (1994), this was Lynn and Clive's first joint book, marking the start of their writing career. Now extensively updated and revised (2006), it has come full circle. Although always presenting compelling circumstantial evidence to link the alleged Holy Shroud of Turin with Leonardo da Vinci, at long last they present the first unassailable concrete evidence. There is no doubt at all now that da Vinci was involved with the Shroud.

(To those who inevitably argue that the Shroud was around - in France a hundred or so years before the Florentine master was even born - the answer is simply that there was a 'Holy Shroud' doing the rounds then, but judging by the contemporary accounts, it was not the same one as today's, Leonardo's brilliant fake.)

Lynn and Clive, together with Keith Prince, were the first researchers to publish the results of their experiments to reproduce all the so-called 'miraculous' characteristics of the Shroud, which even the remaining believers acknowledge 'behaves like a photograph'.

They succeeded beyond their wildest dreams - not only in creating totally Shroud-like images using a very basic pin-hole camera, but they discovered that the expert faker behind it was none other than Leonardo da Vinci, who used his own face as model for Christ.

(So therefore, according to Lynn and Clive, the Shroud is really a 500-year-old photograph of Leonardo da Vinci...)

A known joker, conjuror and illusionist, and a Church-hating heretic - besides being fascinated by what we would call photography, building his own camera obscura - he had the means, opportunity and motive to create this extraordinary work.

Yet, as both art historians and 'Shroudie' believers never failed to point out, there was nothing that undeniably pointed to Leonardo's involvement in creating history's most superb and successful fake. Until now.

As explained in the new Epilogue and new page of illustrations, the exact match between Leonardo's Salavator Mundi (Saviour of the World), painted towards the end of his life, and the face of the man on the Shroud, finally provides the missing link.

At the very least it proves that da Vinci was on intimate terms with the alleged relic - although there is no record of him even having visited it, odd for someone who was a celebrity in his lifetime. Clearly his relationship with the Shroud was clandestine, as it would be if he was its creator.

Taken with all Lynn and Clive's other evidence this is a historic discovery.

Yet words are not enough. See the staggering comparison of the Shroud and Salvator Mundi for yourself...

The dramatic evidence to link Leonardo da Vinci with the Shroud of Turin can be seen immediately by comparing the face of his painting the Salvator Mundi with (a) the face of the man on the Shroud in photographic negative and (b) the portrait of the man on the Shroud painted by Ariel Aggemian in 1935. The exact comparison is final proof positive that da Vinci had an intimate knowledge of the Shroud.

The face of the man on the Shroud compared to Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi
The face of the man on the Shroud compared to Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi

Aggemian’s portrait of the man on the Shroud compared to Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi
Aggemian’s portrait of the man on the Shroud compared to Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi

The match is even more striking in the animated versions in the links below, in which the Shroud image and Aggemian’s portrait are superimposed on the Salvator Mundi. (The links run Windows Media files, which are best viewed in full screen mode. Please be patient while waiting for the clips to load.)

Turin Shroud to Salvator Mundi

Aggemian’s Shroud Portrait to Salvator Mundi

Turin Shroud was the focus of the 1995 BBC TV Everyman programme, 'Double Exposure', and National Geographic's award-winning 2001 Leonardo - the Man Behind the Shroud. The book was also serialised in the Daily Mail.

 

 

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